Startup Gives Free Birth Control In Response to Controversial Pushback

Earlier this month, the administration rolled back the ACA mandate that required the full cost of birth control to be covered by insurance. Under Trump’s agenda, employers can opt out of providing this coverage for “religious” or even “moral” reasons, impacting hundreds of thousands of women.

Nurx, makers of the birth control app, are offering new users up to two months of free birth control with the promo code ‘CHECKYOURFACTS’ today until the end of the year. The telemedicine start-up and mobile health platform makes birth control and PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) more accessible to everyone through partnerships with physicians and in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability Act of 1996 (HIPPA).

Recently, anti-abortion activists have become increasingly vocal against Nurx’s expansion into conservative states. The attacks have been made specifically to the app’s ability to prescribe emergency contraceptives to minors without a parent’s consent.

NC Coalition for life said in a statement “Nurx is dangerous, because it provides another way for children under the age of 18 to obtain contraceptives without the knowledge or consent of their parents.” However, Nurx defers to state laws surrounding minimum age for birth control prescriptions which in some states is 12 years of age.

This recent expansion falls in line with Nurx’s mission to provide safe, affordable and increased access to contraceptives and emergency contraceptives.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention credited increased access to low-cost services as a contributing factor to the overall decline in teen and unintended pregnancy rates nationwide. But according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, more than 19.7 million females ages 13 to 44 reside in “contraceptive deserts” and lack reasonable access to public clinics that provide birth control. This is defined areas with at least one clinic or provider for every 1,000 women.

“Research shows that the easier and more affordable birth control is, the more women will use it,” said Dr. Edvard Engesaeth, co-founder of Nurx. “Individuals should not have to jump through unnecessary hoops in order to access care. With Nurx, we are changing the way birth control is issued and accessed and allowing women to get the care they need on their own terms.”

New users will receive a $30 credit or two months of no-cost birth control with the promo code. After choosing their birth control brand and type, users answer a few questions and enter their shipping and insurance information for a licensed physician to review. Once the review is complete, the doctor will issue and fill the prescription, which will be delivered on-time and at no additional cost. The promo code ‘CHECKYOURFACTS’ can be entered during checkout until 11:59 PM (PT) on December 31st, 2017.

To download Nurx on Apple and Android devices, visit nurx.com. For more information, follow @NurxApp on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Why Coverage of Prescription Contraception Matters for Men As Well As Women

Though the federal Affordable Care Act requires health insurers to cover many types of contraception, a vasectomy is not one of them.

Contraception – who should be able to use it, and the role of government in its provision – has become a contentious issue, in part due to disagreements over the Affordable Care Act mandate positing that all private insurance plans must cover prescription contraception for women. The issue is not trivial, because nationally representative surveys show that more than 10 million women in the United States use the pill as their current method to prevent pregnancy. The pill is the most popular form of reversible birth control.

Across the political spectrum, both citizens and public officials tend to understand birth control as a “women’s issue” rather than as a healthcare or social policy issue. Usually, birth control is discussed as a matter of reproductive health and rights or treated as an aspect of women’s personal responsibility for managing their own sexuality.

But where do men fit? How do they benefit from the availability and use of prescription birth control coverage? Could a better understanding of the ways prescription birth control coverage benefits heterosexual couples improve bipartisan discussions about coverage for contraception? My research provides insight into both of these questions.

Women’s Contraceptive Use and Couples’ Protection from Pregnancy

Contraception presumes the sexual involvement of couples, but surveys typically ask individual people about what method(s) they as individuals use to prevent pregnancy. By default, a woman who uses the pill for contraception also provides her partner with protection from pregnancy; and if her partner wears a condom, then both participants benefit. Contraception and condoms can be used together, but research shows that, in practice, couples in long-term relationships often move from using condoms to relying solely on prescription contraception.

Notably, interviews I conducted revealed that women who use prescription contraception for long periods of time rarely receive financial help from partners in purchasing it. Thus, although women’s birth control covers men, too, the men do not have to pay for this coverage and its benefits.

Men reap the positive effects of women’s use of prescription contraception in at least three ways: they gain protection from pregnancy without much effort; they avoid using condoms when couples transition to solely using prescription contraception, and they can spend money they might have spent on contraception on other items and pursuits.

There is also another way that men benefit from female contraceptive use that is not often mentioned. Women must deal with the downsides of whatever type of prescription birth control they use – including downsides such as physical side effects like nausea or depression and hassles like having to repeatedly refill prescriptions at the pharmacy. Their male partners are freed from such issues.

Contraceptive Use and the Unequal Burdens of Dissatisfaction

Preventing pregnancy is generally not something that couples enjoy, because it can be stressful, costly, and bothersome. Although public attention focuses on men’s dissatisfaction with condoms, much less attention is paid to women’s dissatisfaction with prescription birth control methods. My research using survey data finds that nearly 40% of women ages 23 to 44 who had ever used hormonal contraception had stopped using it at some point because they were dissatisfied.

Yet even though many women stop using a particular type of prescription contraception, they rarely stop contraception use altogether. They try various methods – different pills, or long-acting reversible contraception devices like implants and intrauterine devices – until they find something that feels right for them. As my in-depth interviews show, although many women experience dissatisfaction with side effects of particular birth control methods, they still believe that they should continue using some kind of prescription method.

Discussions that focus only on the benefits that prescription contraceptive coverage provides to women hide the ways that prescription birth control is very much like other medications – it can cause unpleasant and consequential side effects. By persisting despite dissatisfactions in their search for effective ways to prevent pregnancy, women provide tangible benefits for their partners, who get to avoid pregnancy without sharing such costs.

Even when women find it difficult or unpleasant to use certain methods, they cannot always count on getting male partners to wear condoms – or otherwise take responsibility for the couple’s contraception. This may explain why data from nationally representative surveys show that women who experience dissatisfaction with contraception are at higher risk of unintended pregnancy. When the burden of responsibility for birth control is too great, male partners cannot be counted on to pick up the slack.

What Does the Full Picture Mean for Debates about Contraception Coverage?

Recognizing that men as well as women benefit from prescription birth control coverage is crucial for appropriately evaluating the costs of rolling back the Affordable Care Act mandate for prescription contraception coverage. A nationally representative survey shows that only a very small percentage of people recognize that married women are the most likely to use prescription birth control. This may be because many of us are conditioned to see birth control as something affecting women rather than couples.

Public debates might very well change if more Americans understood all the ways that women, men, and society at large benefit from women’s access to prescription birth control – and their willingness to use it despite dissatisfaction. Too often, pundits and partisan debates treat contractive coverage as simply a women’s issue or benefit.

But if women, especially married women or women in long-term relationships, lose access to the most popular form of reversible contraception, so will men. Both men and women will experience new frustrations and costs.

Startup Launches Uber for Birth Control

nurx-app

SAN FRANCISCO – Nurx, a health technology startup based in San Francisco, recently released a web-based birth control delivery app, allowing women in California to get a prescription for their birth control and have it delivered right to their door within 48 hours at no cost to the end-user.

In more than 100 countries in the world, women are able to access birth control without a prescription. However, in the United States, the process is a much more complicated and burdensome process. Each year in the United States, there are about three million unintended pregnancies. This motivated founders Hans Gangeskar and Dr. Edvard Engesaeth to launch Nurx, making the process easier for women today.

“Research shows that the easier and more affordable birth control is, the more women will use it. Women should not have to jump through these unnecessary hoops, just to access birth control. With Nurx, we are changing this, and allowing women to access their birth control on their own terms.” says Engesaeth a medical doctor and cofounder of Nurx.

The Nurx app works for both new and existing birth control users and the service and shipping are free to anyone with health care. For uninsured patients, Nurx waives the consultation fee, the delivery is still free, and Nurx can connect the user with generic birth control brands for about $15.

The data is stored in a HIPAA-compliant system and forwarded to one of three doctors who review it, typically later that day. – CNN Money on Nurex

“Each user is shipped a three month-supply of their order, making the process more convenient for the user. In many markets, users are also able to receive their order on the same day. Unlike with similar apps, with Nurx, patients can use their insurance to cover their contraceptives, rather than being forced to pay cash,” explains Gangeskar.

How the App Works:

  1. User Chooses Brand – The user selects their brand, answers a few questions, enters their insurance and shipping info.

  2. Doctor Reviews Submission – a Nurx partner physician reviews the request and writes a prescription.

  3. Delivered to Customer – The prescribed medication is delivered at no cost.

In addition to making birth control more accessible, soon, Nurx will also allow users to request PrEP through the app. PrEP (short for Pre-exposure prophylaxis) is a new HIV prevention method in which people who do not have HIV take a daily pill (Truvada) to reduce their chances of infection. Studies have shown Truvada for PrEP to be up to 99% effective in preventing transmission of the virus.

Each year, about 50,000 Americans are infected with HIV. “Unfortunately, awareness about, and access to this revolutionary drug is still a problem. By making Truvada more accessible through our app, we hope to change the game in the fight to end the HIV epidemic.” says Nurx co-founder and CEO, Hans Gangeskar.

The Nurx app was launched in December 2015 and has received substantial praise for making contraception more accessible for women. According to MTV News, Nurx is “The gift we’ve all been waiting for”, and Bustle says, “This will be your favorite app in 2016.” TeenVogue says, “Nurx is essentially like Seamless or 1-800-CONTACTS for your reproductive organs.” And according to Elle Magazine, Nurx is a “game-changer.”

To learn more about Nurx, visit Nurx.com.

[vimeo 141002076 w=640&h=400]

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Preventative Health for Women

 

diverse-group-of-womenThere are several elements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that will majorly impact our healthcare system, but one of the most important new provisions is preventative measures for women’s healthcare.  Although certain preventative measures are allowed under the ACA, there are still certain employers who are exempt when it comes to providing contraceptive coverage in their healthcare plans. However, there are plenty of measures that are covered under the plan and will truly benefit women all over the country including well woman exams, breast exams, STI & HIV screenings and counseling and screening and counseling for domestic violence. These types of preventative measures can only provide positive results for women with health insurance.

I can’t help but think about the millions of Americans without health insurance and the women who will not benefit from these services. Breast cancer is the 2nd most common cancer death in women after lung cancer. Over 200,000 women get diagnosed annually and 40,000 die. Early detection can reduce the chances of getting breast cancer and having preventative screenings included in the ACA can reduce the number of women dying due to breast cancer.

STI and HIV Counseling and Screenings

According to the Guttmacher institute, 19 million new sexully transmitted infections (STI) are reported annually and half of these are among 15-24- year olds. It is estimated that 65 million Americans have a viral STI, with the most common one being genital herpes and it is not curable. Most STIs have no symptoms and can be very hard to detect with a doctor’s visit and many people have no idea they are infected with an STI. Some of these STIs, when left untreated, can lead to more serious illnesses such as pelvic inflammatory disease and cervical cancer. Having access to STI and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) counseling and screenings included in the ACA is extremely important.

In the United States, we have varied opinions on sex, but the reality is our population is not retarding in growth. Sex can be as basic a desire as water, food and oxygen for some Americans. Evidence based research has uncovered that many Americans, especially younger adults and adolescents, do not have access to the factual information about STIs and HIV. In our media, we constantly glorify sex and adolescents are exposed to several television programs that include casual sex with multiple partners.

However, comprehensive sexual health education is not a standard in our country’s public schools. The ACA includes education and information about STIs and HIV, but the hard part is getting people to go to the doctor for this information. With the ACA enacted, there is an opportunity to start encouraging Americans to get annual screenings and to obtain prevention care in order to educate themselves on these issues.

Domestic Violence

One in four women will experience some type of domestic violence in their lifetime, and it is estimated that one-third of female homicide victims that police records have reports of are killed by their intimate partner. This is unbelievable and unacceptable to me. Domestic violence, rape, and sexual violence need to be brought to the forefront of Americans minds. This is a serious issue that needs to be addressed and I believe should be taught in schools along with sexual health information. The fact that the ACA covers screenings and counseling is incredible and this needs to be known. Women may not even know that their health insurance covers these types of things.

Family Planning

This brings me back to the ACA exemptions where certain employers are not required to provide contraceptive counseling and prescriptions. If employers, even those with religious beliefs do not support contraception, want a diverse body of people to be employed at their organization, they need to provide diverse healthcare plans that not only include basic health care, but specific healthcare pertaining to women including contraceptive coverage. It is estimated that nearly 99% of all women have used some sort of contraceptive method in this country.

Birth control can prevent unplanned pregnancies and abortions which saves our country money. Not all women want kids, so having these options are vital to their healthcare plans. Overpopulation is our number one social problem in this country, and it leads to many other issues including water shortages, food shortages and a large population of children being placed into foster homes or adoption agencies because of unplanned pregnancies. Having birth control be easily available and affordable will go a long ways toward prevention.

Income Inequality

Additionally, we must touch on is the gap between the rich and poor and how hard it is for millions of Americans to even obtain affordable health insurance. The ACA is a large step towards providing healthcare to the uninsured in our country, but it needs to be expanded further. It’s not perfect and many Americans are being caught in the Medicaid gap where they don’t make enough money to qualify for subsidy, yet they are in a State which refuses to expand Medicaid. If more Americans can received annual checkups and screenings, many may be able to identify and access preventive care to prolong life. Right now, it seems that the majority of Americans only go to the doctor when it is an emergency which needs to change.

Preventative healthcare is one of our country’s solution to address our nation’s growing healthcare problems. Hopefully, the ACA will lead to more systematic healthcare reforms in order to change the ways our country handles health issues and social problems. Feel free to share this with organizations that work with adolescents, schools, sexual health clinics, etc.. BeYouBeHealthy.org 

Exit mobile version