When Someone Asks #YSocialWork Does It Feel Like An Insult

Social Work is a tough profession even under the best of circumstances, but the impact social workers have on the lives we touch can influence the trajectory of a life over its lifespan. Many of us choose this profession for a variety of reasons. However, if you surveyed a huge sample of social workers, many would say the profession chose them.

From birth to hospice, Social Workers enter the lives of people when they are in crisis throughout the spectrum of life. Social Workers are the first responders for social issues and family intervention because we are called in when problems begin to show up on the radar. From domestic violence and suicide prevention to cancer awareness, social workers provide intervention and advocacy on many issues because we directly impact our clients and their ability to heal.

March is National Social Work month and every third Tuesday in March is World Social Work Day. Social work month is the one time of year social workers celebrate our profession and each other. It’s the one time of year, social workers feel allowed to pat themselves on the back and say good job or well done even if no one else does.

Unfortunately, the magnitude of our impact is often compromised by having access to limited resources and funding, worker burnout, depression, outdated systems and processes to increase efficiency, and a host of other issues that are too long to list in this article. As a result, social workers become the faces of the failed systems in which we work. So, when someone outside the profession, family, or friends asks why social work, does it not sometimes feel like they are insulting your choice of profession?

#YSocialWork

According to Twitter, the very first #YSocialWork tweet came from a Master of Public Administration student who simply tweeted #YSocialWork

When Shauntia White, the event organizer for Social Work Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill, began planning a #YSocialWork campaign for the event on March 17th, I felt Social Work Month would be the perfect opportunity for social workers to explain #YSocialWork is important to us and potential future social workers. Sometimes, it can be a bit frustrating always having to defend your chosen profession or having to explain why social work matters, but we are our best brand advocates. Our profession often falls victim to a majority of negative articles or comments when something bad happens. However, this is an opportunity for us to flood social media with positive messages about why social work matters.

To help celebrate social work month, I invite you to participate in the #YSocialWork social media campaign. Social Work Helper is launching the #YSocialWork campaign in conjunction with Congresswoman Barbara Lee chair of the Congressional Social Work Caucus, Congressional Research Institute for Social Work Policy (CRISP), Greater Washington Society for Clinical Social Work, and Catholic University of America (CUA).

How to Participate in #YSocialWork

Print out the attached campaign sign below, write your message of empowerment, and create a picture or video holding the #YSocialWork campaign sign below. You can post your #YSocialWork message to Twitter, Tumblr, Linkedin, Facebook, and/or Instagram. Also, you must include the #YSocialWork hashtag in your post to share your message with other social workers. Will you participate and also share this experience with others to help celebrate Social Work Month with us?

Twitter Example:

Facebook Example:

 

Also, if you tag Social Work Helper in your tweet using @swhelpercom, on instagram @socialworkhelper, on Tumblr, or Facebook at facebook.com/swhelper, I will be resharing tags to Social Work Helper on all SWH social media outlets including Pinterest and Google Plus. Social Work Helper has a combined social media reach of 110,000 people.

Don’t miss the opportunity to share with the social work community at large your message of empowerment, an issue you care about locally, or why you chose social work as your profession. I look forward to sharing your messages.

Happy Social Work Month!

Social Work Advocacy Day: Ensuring the Future of the Social Work Profession

CapitolHillDCHP

Washington, DC- On March 17, social work students and social workers will attend the first Social Work Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill  launched by Social Work Members of Congress.

With the support of the Greater Washington Society for Clinical Social Work (GWSCSW) and the Congressional Research Institute for Social Work and Policy (CRISP), Howard University (Jenna Simpson), and Amanda Benjamin (University of Maryland) have organized a late-morning advocacy training for students and emerging professionals, to complement the Congressional Social Work Caucus “Social Work Day on the Hill”.

The day’s events will provide an opportunity for students to learn how policy is shaped and how pertinent issues are addressed the affect the profession as a whole. A major focus will be the Social Work Reinvestment Act (SWRA), a groundbreaking initiative created to address the challenges faced by social workers and recommend strategies to maximize the services social workers provide, with recommendations spanning recruitment, research funding, educational debt, salary inequalities, and more.

In-person training will provide an opportunity for millennials to voice ideas and concerns to legislators and congressional staff, to speak up about the need for support for professional growth and innovation in the field, and to experience the power of getting involved in direct advocacy.

#YSocialWork

The social work profession can be viewed as the back­bone of health care and social services with more than 650,000 individuals with social work degrees employed in the field.  It is also one of the fastest growing careers in the United States: the Bureau of Labaor Statistics (2012) anticipates that the percentage of Americans who are employed in a variety of social work settings is expected to increase by more than 100,000 jobs by 2022.

A 2013 Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Annual Survey of Social Work reported that 46% of Master’s degrees were awarded to individ­uals aged 25–34 years, 86.4% were women, and 31.2% were from under-represented groups.  By field placements, 22.9% of master’s students were placed in mental health, compared to 1.8% in administration and 0.8% in social policy.

Why are millennials entering into the profession and how can this profes­sion adapt along with society to the millennial culture? Through the use of social media, our advocacy project will provide each social work student an opportunity to share their narrative of what led them to join the profession of social work

Since the beginning of the year, it has been an utmost honor to be able to organize such a meaningful event where social workers can gather together and cele­brate the profession. Our project will continue, after Student Advocacy Day. We want students to realize that they do not need to wait to be licensed to get involved or to be politicians to make policy changes. They can visit Capitol Hill and have a voice at the policy making table on our future professional careers. There will be more opportunities to learn, to advocate, and to participate in social media campaigns supporting social work as we begin Social Work Month in March.

I pledge to uphold social work values and engage in generativity with those who train after me. I invite you to join me in paving the way for younger generations to ensure the future of the social work profession.

Exit mobile version