President Obama, A Social Worker Is Your Ideal Poverty Czar

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Last week, President Barack Obama once again did the unusual by participating in a panel discussion as part of Georgetown University’s Catholic-Evangelical Leadership Summit on Overcoming Poverty. It was a rare setting for a sitting president but proved to be an interesting exchange of ideas with a couple of thought leaders on the subject of why so many (45 million below the poverty threshold) have so little in the land of plenty.

Moderated by Washington Post columnist E. J. Dionne, the discussion included Harvard professor Robert Putnam, and American Enterprise Institute’s president Arthur C. Brooks. Putnam’s latest book, “Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis,” has renewed interest in the numbers of American children who are mired in poverty with bleak hopes for the future. Brooks has captured the imagination of many with his own brand of compassionate conservatism which sees free enterprise’s most important work as not generating wealth but creating opportunities for the poor.

It was a bold move for President Obama to put himself on the proverbial hot seat because his administration has garnered criticism from those who believe he could do more for the poor. This appearance prompted Martin Luther King, III to renew his call for a “poverty czar” to coordinate poverty reduction efforts across agencies. King was among those who called for the appointment of a poverty czar during the run up to the 2008 presidential elections. Candidate Obama was noncommittal then, however, candidate Hillary Clinton embraced the idea. Appointing a poverty czar this late in President’s tenure does not seem likely, yet those living below the poverty line can use all the help available.

What other profession equips you with the knowledge and skills needed to bring people together to address issues of great magnitude such as poverty? At the top of the list would be Oakland, California Congresswoman Barbara Lee, who currently chairs the Democratic Whip Task Force on Poverty, Income Inequality, and Opportunity. She is the co-founder and co-chair of the Out of Poverty Caucus and chair of the Congressional Social Work Caucus.Should the President decide to appoint someone as poverty czar, it would be wise to consider a social worker for the position. Who else would you appoint? Who better understands the many dimensions of poverty than a social worker?

Reducing and eliminating poverty has been at the forefront of Congresswoman Lee’s legislative agenda. One of the first bills she introduced in the 114th Congress in January was H.R. 258—the Half in Ten Act of 2015 that would establish a Federal Interagency Working Group on Reducing Poverty within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that would develop a national strategy to reduce the number of persons living in poverty in America by half within 10 years after release of the 2014 Census Report on Income and Poverty in the United States. She also sponsored H.R. 1305—the Income Equity Act of 2015 that would address escalating income inequality by denying employers tax deductions on excess compensation. However, Congresswoman Lee has much unfinished business as a Member of Congress and may wish to remain.

One might think retiring Senator Barbara Mikulski would consider taking on the challenge of being poverty czar but that’s probably not in the cards as newly-elected Republican Governor Larry Hogan could appoint a Republican as her replacement diminishing the Democrats very good chance of recapturing the Senate in 2016. Should the President look off the Hill, there are several highly qualified social workers who would fill the role of poverty czar.

Michael Sherraden, the George Warren Brown Distinguished University Professor at Washington University in St. Louis is director of the Center for Social Development and has done extensive research on asset development for the poor. Jane Waldfogel, professor of social work and public affairs at Columbia University, played a significant role in crafting policies that help cut Britain’s child poverty rate in half.

Social workers have provided significant leadership for the federal government, most notably Frances Perkins and Harry Hopkins who were key administrators for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt during the implementation of the New Deal. Social workers are uniquely trained to understand poverty and address it roots causes. If President Obama decides to appoint a poverty czar, he should have social workers at the top of his list.

Leading Change Through Community Practice

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Social work is one of the fastest-growing professions in the United States, and one of the most rewarding. Community practice focused professionals work at the state and national level to promote empowerment, social change, social justice, and increased quality of life.

Through the building of coalitions/networks, program design and implementation, community practice social workers change the lives of millions of people each day. Based on an infographic by Case Western Reserve University, we’ve highlighted a few of the individuals today that are making an impact on the local, state and national stage.

Susan Blasko, Program Facilitator For Youth & Technology, PNC Fairfax Connection ~”Celebrating the community’s proud history and legacy of hope.”

As program facilitator for PNC Fairfax Connection, Ms. Blasko provides community access to childhood programs, historic preservation and cultural resources for the families of Cleveland, Ohio’s Fairfax neighborhood. Through the program “Grow Up Great,” Ms. Blasko leads a $350 million initiative for bilingual early childhood education.

Geoffrey Canada, CEO, Harlem Children’s Zone~“Cradle to College to Career.”

As the CEO of Harlem Children’s Zone, Mr. Canada leads the charge to serve over 10,000 children and 7,400 adults through a series of educational, social, health, and community-building programs to encourage academic success.  In just the last 10 years, Harlem Children’s Zone has expanded service coverage from 24 blocks to 100 blocks.

Frank Farrow, Director, Center For The Study of Social Policy ~“Ideas into action”

As Director for the Center For The Study Of Social Policy, Frank Farrow develops public policy solutions and provides technical assistance to support vulnerable children and families. The program’s initiative is to strengthen families and prevent child abuse.  In 2012, the Center For The Study Of Social Policy reached 35,000 participants in 23 states.

Paula McCoy, Consultant and Former President/CEO, North Carolina Minority Support Center ~”Serving Strengthening Sustaining Our Communities.”

Today, Ms. McCoy works to create economic opportunity through small business funding and community credit union advocacy across North Carolina. Ms. McCoy has helped 43 small businesses receive the funding they need through the procurement of $2.6 million in loan funding.

Sandra Moore, President, President, Urban Strategies ~”Engaging residents, revitalizing community, empowering possibility.”

As President of Urban Strategies, Ms. Moore leads the charge in rebuilding the physical and human infrastructure in redeveloping urban communities. Currently, Urban Strategies serves 19,980 low to moderate-income families in 14 communities in the United States.

Tom O’Brien, Program Director, Neighborhood Connections (The Cleveland Foundation) ~“Igniting the power of everyday people.”

Mr. Obrien leads the initiative of the Cleveland Foundation’s Neighborhood Connections. Through community grants and funding for over 1,600 projects, he has worked tirelessly to provide neighborhood grants to support every day people that are actively using their creativity, passion, ingenuity and connectedness to make life better.

Michael Sherraden, Founding Director, Center for Social Development ~“Enable individuals, families, and communities to formulate and achieve life goals.”

In 2010, Dr. Sherraden was named one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People. As the founding director for the Center For Social Development, he leads the organization in the development of public policy innovations to enhance social and economic opportunities for disadvantaged communities. The center focuses programs on asset building, civic service & engagement, productive aging and thriving communities.

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