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    If Social Workers are Intrinsic to Humanity, Why Should We Strive to Make the Profession Redundant?

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    As social workers, your use of ‘self’ is the most fundamental tool in your kit bag. This is why particularly when our profession faces huge challenges, we must be reflexive.  Globally, we are living through unprecedented times. A failure of the capitalist framework which scaffolds our lives has reduced the resources that we and our service users rely on. Our first instinct is to demand more from the hierarchical structures which govern us, voice our concerns and hope to be heard. We do this because that is the system that we are conditioned to, and it’s the way society works.

    We question the system and critique it for being out of touch. Why do the powers that be choose what aspects of our concerns to highlight and minimise what we consider to be core issues? How can a system intended to empower people and improve lives, leave people feeling decimated?

    These questions can be applied to our personal selves, our profession and on behalf of the individuals and families we support. But to answer them requires time to think about whether the individual answers for our personal self, our profession, and our service users harmonise or create conflict. There are no easy answers. In some cases as an individual and a social worker you may consider that both you and your service users will benefit from you having a reduced caseload to enable you to dedicate more time.

    This is an important issue and the answer is one where you might consider the result is increased harmony which is deserving of more funding. But do all areas of public service require greater provision, more doctors, nurses, teachers, soldiers and police? Hey, she forgot to mention social workers! Sadly this omission was deliberate to make the point that an increase in the number of social workers is rarely voiced as a national issue.

    Despite a lack of national prevalence, social workers are crucial to our country’s success.  This is because social workers stand committed to wanting to make a positive difference, to support and empower our service users to live safe and fulfilling lives. However, although social workers can be the human face of a bureaucratic policy, on occasions we also represent an impersonal faceless system.

    Listen or read any criticism of the social work profession by service users and it is underpinned by a sense of dehumanisation. Somehow amidst carefully designed systems and well intentioned policies the interventions of social workers leave some people feeling despair, fear and hatred. This was never the intended outcome of the social work profession, whose ultimate goal is one of redundancy, of not being required by a well functioning society.

    You may think this utopia is unrealistic and will never be achieved. I fully understand that position. It is natural to feel overwhelmed simply trying to survive the daily challenges that our personal and professional lives bring. We are only human, how can we meet the needs of humanity? When in truth the question should be: We are human, how can we not meet the needs of humanity?

    This may feel like a heavy burden for social workers to carry, but I believe it is part of our DNA, an aspect of our self. Our personal lives led us to this profession and professional training supports our knowledge base and skills. We are taught to analyse and reflect on the needs of service users and our decision making processes as individual social workers.  We need to extend that reflexivity to our profession to be honest enough to own our mistakes and apply ourselves to fundamental change. We can only change ourselves not others, so let’s agree what we can do and not focus upon what others prevent us from doing.  We owe it to ourselves and humankind.

    Donna Peach is postgraduate student developing dialogical phenomenology as a theoretical paradigm to explore infant self-awareness. Alongside her work as an expert witness for the family courts, she also pursuing a future in psychology. www.donnapeach.co.uk

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    4 Comments

    4 Comments

    1. Batuhan Kaba

      Batuhan Kaba

      April 19, 2014 at 1:42 pm

      Sayfayi Begen , Bildirim Al , Fame Ol ? 9

    2. ChangeTheWorld

      July 14, 2012 at 8:40 pm

      This is so encouraging. Every social worker should read this when they are feeling like they are not helping anything. Thanks for sharing and thanks for all of your hard work!

    3. Donna Peach

      July 10, 2012 at 6:55 pm

      Hi Terry, Thanks for your comment. I agree there are many agenda’s which blur the way forward. However, I think for those of us who want to make a positive difference and there are millions of us, it is achieveable. I believe the future is bright, especially if like minded people keep talking and sharing good ideas and knowledge. The power is where we place it, we need to stop feeling disempowered, we have a voice and together we will become a chorus which will resonate throughout the world. 🙂

    4. Terry Carroll

      July 10, 2012 at 5:01 pm

      Hi Donna, I read and enjoyed your report on the intrinsic value of social work in society and like you, I have enjoyed a long and rewarding career,most of the time. The problems in social work are simply this. Not everyone is pulling in the same direction, we don’t all have the same ends in mind and we don’t all believe in the intrinsic rights of individuals to make mistakes from which they can learn. We have people in power who are on power trips and people in power who simply don’t care and people in power who really don’t understand what social work is from a helping point of view. We also have people in power who are totally unrealistic about change and how it happens. The question for me is,why do we need social workers and there are many reasons.

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