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    Why It’s Not So Easy to “Just Get the Hell Out”

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    One of the many difficult questions survivors of toxic relationships ask themselves is “why is it so hard to leave someone who treats me so badly?”  As rational people, we recognize that a relationship is extremely problematic and believe that the rational course of action would be just to stop the drama.

    And yet, this is usually harder than it sounds.

    While there are practical and logistical barriers to people exiting, the emotional resistance to leaving is usually present even when there aren’t kids or property or business deals or divorce laws slowing us down.

    What accounts for this?  Why is it so common?

    Social science has some insights that help to explain what’s going on here.  Knowing them may help you understand your own behavior (and the toxic person’s), help you exit or recover, and help you comfort yourself with the knowledge that if you’ve been caught in a toxic relationship, the dynamics that hooked you are dynamics that have tripped up many other human beings. They are also dynamics that you can change or avoid, once you’re in the know.

    Here are seven principles from social science that will help you understand why it’s challenging to “just get the hell out.”

    1. Intermittent reinforcement

    They come, they go. The love you, they disappear. They love-bomb you, they tell you nobody else would want you.  These mixed messages may come quickly or may emerge slowly, but they hook us by making us wonder how we can stay on the happy side of the person’s attention and affection.

    If the messages were all negative, we could easily walk away.  When we’ve had some taste of what it feels like to be “loved,” and then the behaviors we interpret as love disappear, it’s the fact of intermittent reinforcement that keeps us hanging in, trying to get the good stuff back.

    2. The principle of least interest
    At first, you are the center of their attention. Over time they are “just not that into you.”  The principle of least interest argues that the person who has the least interest in preserving a relationship has the most power in it.

    Think of how this works with car salespeople: if you can walk away from the deal, you have more negotiating power. Toxic partners and family members manipulate the principle of least interest. As they back off, ignore, you, ghost you, or otherwise fade or disappear emotionally or otherwise for periods of time, they also accrue power — if you allow it by remaining intensely interested in “saving” the relationship.

    3. How secrets create intimacy between secret keepers

    Sociologist Georg Simmel argued that, “every relationship between two individuals or two groups will be characterized by the ratio of secrecy that is involved in it.”  In healthy relationships, people are transparent with each other in generous degrees.

    In toxic relationships, toxic people withhold information to manipulate you and have power over you and your choices. When they have affairs, they create intimacy with someone else who is then in on a secret (the relationship) that is invisible to you.

    You may not leave because of the information that has been withheld from you, or because your partner’s other relationships are used to provoke you into competing for their attention, or if you aren’t savvy about how triangulation (the classic “love triangle” between three people) can be triggered by secret keeping.

    4. Cognitive Dissonance

    The experience of holding two competing beliefs simultaneously, cognitive dissonance is common among people in toxic relationships. “I love them” and “They treat me badly” are two beliefs that create the kind of tension associated with cognitive dissonance. “They are my sister so I should help them” and “they never repay the money I loan them” are two similarly competing beliefs.

    Cognitive dissonance keeps us in emotional turmoil and slows us down in figuring out the best course of action to take for our health and happiness.

    5. The Sunk Costs Fallacy

    “Sunk costs” are the investments we have already made in an enterprise — or a relationship. The “fallacy” refers to our human tendency to over-estimate what we will lose by ending the endeavor and to under-estimate what we will lose by continuing.

    In toxic relationships, this works to your disadvantage because it creates a tendency to expect, despite the evidence to the contrary, that if you just invest a bit more, the other person will become kind, appreciative, or reciprocal.  We underestimate the advantage of the “risk” involved with walking away. You can see how this belief sets you up to give until it hurts even more.

    6. “Opportunity Cost” denial

    Every day we spend in a toxic relationship is a day we don’t spend enjoying our single life or sharing happiness with a loving, supportive partner.  While our focus is on the drama, pain, or trouble created by a toxic relationship, we are missing out on opportunities for joy, connection, freedom, and happiness because the opportunities are less in our line of sight. Just like the moon behind the clouds, though, they are there all the time. When we see true alternatives to suffering, we can make choices to minimize opportunity cost.

    7. Decision fatigue

    Toxic relationships involve extraordinary decision making, often including re-evaluating every day whether you will stay in the relationship or exit. Neuroscience tells us that decision-making demands remarkable amounts of mental energy, leaving people exhausted.

    As a result of decision fatigue, the quality of our decisions declines; we become less able to clearly see our options, assess potential outcomes, and accurately evaluate what we might gain or lose as a result of different decisions. Because of our tendency to under-estimate the costs of staying and over-estimate the costs of “losing” a toxic relationship, we may be inclined to continue to choose to stay when deciding from a place of decision fatigue.

    Understanding what happens in toxic relationships through the insights of social science can help us see exploitive relationships more clearly. Even more importantly, these concepts can help us see more clearly the ways our own minds work, how we are vulnerable to making decisions that keep us in difficult situations, and how we can redirect our energies into more liberating, more loving relationships.

    Amber Ault, MSW, PhD (amberault.com) offers coaching in the US and Europe to family members, partners, and Exes of Borderline, Narcissistic, Antisocial and other toxic people, helping them move into lives of peace, love, and ease. Dr. Ault is author of "The Five Step Exit: Skills You Need to Leave a Narcissist, Psychopath, or Other Toxic Partner and Recover Your Happiness Now," and "The Wise Lesbian Guide to Getting Free from Crazy-making Relationships" . She offers courses through love fraud.com and amberault.com

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