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    10 Apps That Help With Killing Your Idle Time

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    Pretty bored

    Regardless of how scheduled your life is, there is some time between one task and the next where you find yourself idle. Perhaps while waiting at a subway or the dental clinic. Downtimes like these are quite vital for preserving our health. But you cannot dismiss the fact that you need some activity to keep yourself occupied, even while resting. There is only limited social media browsing you can do before boredom hits you and that is where you yearn for something more interesting.

    Both the Apple App Store and Google Play Store are loaded with apps to help you pass your time. Here are 10 apps that will keep you engaged with little or no effort. On top of everything, these apps are free. So install them right away, and you’d never want those tedious waiting periods to end.

    Flow Free

    This app contains all the gears that you need to keep your mind running when you are bored. It involves connecting colored dots with pipes to create a flow, and once you cover a board, you can move on to the next. Like every other game, it starts with easy levels and switches to harder ones. At first, it may sound very simple, but the gradual stage progression brings on levels that are quite tough to solve. Pipes break if they overlap or cross over one another which increases the challenge.

    Who can get 11?

    This brain-teasing app challenges the player to get an 11. So far, only limited people have succeeded to make an 11, even though the method is pretty simple. All you have to do is merge matching numerical tiles and create higher values unless you finally make an 11. One needs to think hard, use strategies and logic to reach the target. And while they mull over, they can surely kill a lot of their idle time.

    Words with friends

    Are you a vocab geek? If yes, then this app can be your best friend. It challenges your vocabulary and kills time all at once. Words with friends is an app designed like scrabble that pits you against any of your friends or random people online. It provides the player with few letters which they have to use to create words. Each tile has a score that multiplies when you reach a certain block. Users can also opt for solo play if they are willing to brush up their word power.

    Bubble wrap

    Finally, an app to fulfill the crazy obsession of popping the bubble wrap. You can pop the air-filled pockets in any way you want as the app offers different popping options. Although it’s not real, you can get close to a similar level of satisfaction that you get when popping the real one.

    Quiz up

    Who doesn’t like information that comes about aesthetically and enhances your mental power? This is an app for you if quiz games are your forte. It offers options from academics to entertainment and is indeed an ultimate knowledge booster. You can pick a topic from over a hundred themes and give your brain an instant work-out. You can even opt for multi-player segments and keep the trivia community alive.

    Iron Ball Ride

    Following the rules of gravity and physics, this app tends to keep you hooked for a long time. It appears like you are almost there all along and this compels you to keep trying over and over again. People either quit out of frustration or come out victorious. The objective is to tilt, swipe and turn the ball which will roll the iron marble once the player overcomes the obstacles. This game has a lot of levels to keep you addicted.

    Peak

    Studying through review forums like AirG reviews, you might come across discussions where people praise games that work on engagingly training the brains. The Peak is one such app that made its way to these forums for its distinct design. It is a specialized app created by a team of neuroscientists and gaming experts to train and enhance the cognitive skills of the players. There are more than 30 games with in-depth statistics to track your progress. Difficulty levels are modified according to these statistics that enhance the challenge for players at each level. You can also invite your friends and compete with them.

    Duo Lingo

    Have you ever tried learning a new language but couldn’t pursue it for one reason or another? Well, here is your chance to do it now.  By using Duolingo, you can pick from French, Spanish, English, German and twenty other languages. There are regular lessons and competitive exercises that will improve your learning at every stage. The developers make sure they keep productivity and leisure integrated throughout the design.

    Word Bubbles

    Word Bubbles is like an old-school word search game with a modern twist. It provides a set of letters, and the player has to swipe letters along the bubbles to spell a word. There are more than 400 levels which gradually get harder, and there are daily challenges to keep users in the loop.

    Tender

    Unlike the gaming apps that we talked about earlier, this app is different. It offers a platform where food lovers from all over the world interact with each other and talk about food-related topics. You can swipe through the photos and find the recipe of any item that seems tempting to you. So, while you are waiting for your train to reach your destination, you can decide what you are going to cook for dinner tonight!

    Despite your workload, you might have a few gaps here and there. Choose to give yourself a mental boost and make every second count.

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    Audrey Throne is a freelance writer and a content contributor at www.braintest.com, which provides dementia testing online. Live simply, give generously, watch football and a technology lover.

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    Technology and Entrepreneurship in Social Work

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    After helplessly watching her sister try to navigate the international adoption process, Felicia Curcuru launched Binti in an effort to reinvent foster care and adoption. Since the launch of the company in 2017, Binti has expanded its network to over 190 agencies across 26 states in the U.S. The software Binti creates helps social workers and others who work in foster care to effectively approve 80% more families and decrease their administrative burden by up to 40%.

    Jimmy Chen, a Stanford graduate and the son of struggling immigrants from China, created Propel in 2014 after noticing that Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients needed to call a 16-digit phone number to check their balance. In order to check their balances, some of the recipients would resort to strategies such as buying cheap items such as bananas. Currently, the Propel app helps 5 million households who are eligible for SNAP benefits to manage their finances!

    Besides using technology and entrepreneurship to transform human service systems, what do these companies have in common? They were not started by social workers.

    Technology and Entrepreneurship in Social Work

    Technology and entrepreneurship have and will continue to transform our profession. But social workers have stayed on the sidelines of this creative process for too long. If we are to be successful in effectively disseminating our incredible values and pushing forth the mission of social work, social workers must play a more direct role in embracing the movements of technology and entrepreneurship.

    This is not a new concept. Research articles on technology and entrepreneurship in social work have been published for years, and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) has published reports on technology in social work. Furthermore, universities such as Columbia University in New York have embraced the movement, and have created a minor for social workers called “Emerging Technology, Media, and Society,” which trains social workers to understand the latest developments in the world of technology. Finally, thousands of social workers operate their own private practices and embrace the benefits of entrepreneurial practices.

    This slow, yet continuous shift towards technology and entrepreneurship is important, but it must be accelerated. The question still remains: how do we enable social workers to embrace the power behind technology and entrepreneurship? Here are some ideas:

    Enabling Social Workers to Embrace Technology and Entrepreneurship

    First and foremost, social work curricula must embrace technology and entrepreneurship. The curricula must incorporate mandatory courses on technology and entrepreneurship, and these courses should be taught by experts in these fields.

    Social work departments must enable field placements for social workers in technology or startup environments. By being a part of successful organizations in these spaces, social work students can be exposed to this type of thinking and be inspired by the possibilities!

    Social workers themselves must take time to explore and learn about these fields. Although it is difficult enough to maintain our mental health while managing our caseloads, we can utilize the time we spend on webinars or Continuing Education Units (CEUs) to take classes in technology and entrepreneurship.

    Social workers can become intrapreneurs, or employees that create new projects from within organizations and businesses. For example, during my time at a community mental health organization, I helped launch a social media channel for the organization’s therapists, which allowed us to feel more connected, share resources, and learn from one another.

    Moving Forward

    As social workers, we uphold an ethical code that enables us to represent the most marginalized members of our society. But we can only do this effectively by embracing the intersection between technology, entrepreneurship, and social work. Although there is no silver-bullet answer, we can help social workers gain entrepreneurial and technological skills by broadening the education available to social work students and ourselves so that we can all better understand the possibilities that are out there.

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    The Digital Divide is a Human Rights Issue

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    The COVID-19 pandemic shed a glaring light on the important role that technology and access to high-speed internet play our lives. You would not be able to read this story without an internet connection and a device to read it on. How would you communicate with loved ones, do your homework or pay your bills without broadband?

    Cynthia K. Sanders, associate professor and online program director in the College of Social Work, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Human Rights and Social Work that argues access to high-speed internet, or broadband, is a human rights and social justice issue. Lack of access disproportionately impacts low-income, People of Color, seniors, Native Americans and rural residents. Sanders joined the University of Utah in July 2021.

    “Much of my work is around financial, social or political inclusion,” said Sanders. “The digital divide certainly represents a lack of social inclusion because there are so many things associated with access to broadband in terms of how we think about our daily lives and opportunities, especially highlighted by the pandemic. It creates a clear social exclusion situation.”

    At least 20 million Americans do not have access to broadband, according to the Federal Communications Commission. Some estimates are as high as 162 million, said Sanders. While there are federal funds allocated toward addressing access to broadband internet, Sanders and her co-author, Edward Scanlon from the University of Kansas, argue the digital divide must be viewed as more than a policy or infrastructure issue.

    “When we know that the people who don’t have it are already disadvantaged in many ways, it should also be viewed as a human rights and social justice issue,” said Sanders. “And it’s also about more than just whether broadband is available in certain areas. Even if it is available, not everyone can afford it or devices available to access it. If they do have the devices or can pay for it, they may not have the digital literacy skillset to effectively use technology and broadband for many of the opportunities it provides like applying for jobs, furthering one’s education, accessing health care or medical records and staying in touch with friends and family.”

    In order to reduce the digital divide, Sanders said there are community-based, grassroots initiatives that can serve as excellent models—including one here in Utah.

    “The Murray School District used some federal funds to create their own long-term evolution network (LTE) and that’s something no other district in the nation has done,” said Sanders. “It’s a great example and something we can learn from in the absence of a more national strategy.”

    The authors also urge social workers to get involved through policy advocacy, coalition building and program development around initiatives such as low-cost broadband, low-cost devices and creating digital literacy programs.

    “From a social work perspective, we need to be part of this discussion around ways to help close the digital divide for particularly marginalized groups,” said Sanders. “We can be involved in lobbying and working with legislators and policymakers to educate about the digital divide, who it impacts and the funding needed for some of these grassroots initiatives that can truly impact peoples’ daily lives.”

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    What We Learned from the IIA’s Webinar on Broadband Affordability

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    On Monday, September 13th, the Internet Innovation Alliance (IIA) held a webinar entitled Deleting the Broadband Affordability Divide: A Virtual Chat with FCC Acting Chair Rosenworcel. The event was headlined by a discussion between FCC Acting Chair Jessica Rosenworcel and IIA Co-Chair Kim Keenan and featured a star-studded cast of accomplished women, including:

    • Joi Chaney, Executive Director of National Urban League’s Washington Bureau and Senior Vice President for Policy and Advocacy
    • Dr. Dominique Harrison, Director of Technology Policy for the Joint Center
    • Rosa Mendoza, Founder, President and CEO of ALLvanza

    The goal of this event was to discuss the FCC’s Emergency Broadband Benefit (EBB) Program’s success thus far, what challenges remain, and ultimately, how the federal government and other actors are fairing in addressing the digital divide in the United States. In the following, we’ll take a look at the key takeaways and information shared in the webinar and assess the current status of the EBB Program in America. But before we do that, we must understand the context and why such initiatives are vitally important.

    The Digital Divide

    The digital divide has essentially been around ever since the World Wide Web emerged some 30 years ago. The problem has been widely known for decades, but action has largely remained stagnant. The issue started to gain more traction in the last ten years as much of everyday life transitioned to or became intertwined with the digital world. It became clear that Americans across the country were being left behind. Initial policy efforts focused chiefly on accessibility and availability, but we know now that the real issue lies with broadband adoption, i.e., affordability of broadband access.

    Following the outbreak of COVID-19 and the vast reliance on the digital world that has followed, it became utterly apparent how strong the digital divide is and how essential it was to ensure no one is left behind. A third of American households have worried about paying their broadband bills during the pandemic. COVID-19 also made it clear how substantial the gap is in broadband availability for under-served communities, with just 71% of African American adults having broadband access. Compared to 65% for Hispanic adults and 80% for White adults.

    Given these apparent gaps and severe consequences at hand following COVID-19, the FCC enacted the Emergency Broadband Benefit (EBB) Program to address this critical issue before it’s far too late.

    The Importance of the Webinar

    Despite the initiative at the federal level from the FCC, such programs cannot succeed on their own. That’s where organizations and coalitions like the Internet Innovation Alliance (IIA) come in. The IIA is a coalition that has supported broadband availability and access for all Americans for the last 17 years. They hosted this webinar intending to increase awareness behind the EBB Program and the work that remains to be done. Given the problems that COVID-19 has so clearly illuminated regarding broadband connections, it was essential to keep the momentum building on the EBB Program. And that’s precisely what the IIA webinar achieved. With that being said, let’s look at what the EBB is and what we learned about it in the webinar.

    What is EBB?

    The main goal of the EBB Program is to make broadband affordable to everyone and get 100% broadband access in America. It’s the most extensive broadband affordability program in our nation’s history, with initial funding from Congress set at $3.2 billion. The idea is to obviously address the affordability aspect of broadband, mainly to help lower-income households from falling behind, and thus, creating an even bigger divide in our country.

    The EBB Program aims to keep those online struggling to afford it and help get those online who haven’t been before. EBB provides up to $50 a month to families who qualify, and that number goes up to $75 a month on tribal lands. The Program also works closely with providers to offer discounts on tablets and laptops. Five and a half million households have signed up thus far. But as FCC Acting Chair Rosenworcel mentioned, this is just the beginning.

    Many households qualify but have yet to reap the benefits, and a big reason behind that is a lack of trust. Unsurprisingly, many Americans are reluctant to trust a new federally-run program automatically, so is the case with EBB. To counter this, the FCC has utilized more than 33,000 partners around the world to help them. Whether massive organizations or small, local groups, the FCC has entrusted their partners to help facilitate the Program and make the community connections needed for it to work.

    With that being said, let’s look at some of the key takeaways from the IIA webinar.

    Key Takeaways

    As mentioned previously, perhaps the most significant barriers to success for the EBB Program are trust and reach. However, the FCC has held over 300 events around the country and has worked with other federal agencies and even the National Football League (NFL) to help further the Program. Even so, it’s the local actors, communities, and leaders that’ll make all the difference. In Baltimore, for example, a city impeded by this issue perhaps more than any other, there are local organizations going door to door to spread the word, and the mayor fully supports the Program. The FCC hopes for more of the same in urban areas around the country, which struggle more with broadband connection than previously imagined.

    The FCC has even created a detailed yet straightforward outreach toolkit to help local actors get the message out to assist in such community endeavors. The toolkit is available in 13 different languages to ensure messaging is as effective as possible. They also have a mobile-friendly app which has helped a lot of people get started in the Program.

    The most important takeaway from the IIA webinar is that this Program’s success will depend heavily on local communities.

    Closing Statements

    The IIA webinar made it clear that we can be hopeful about addressing the digital divide. This strong group of women, headlined by the confident and passionate Rosenworcel, are highly dedicated to this Program and evening the playing field around the country. There’s no doubt work remains to be done, but the Program is progressing steadily nonetheless. Let’s tackle this problem together to ensure no one is left behind.

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