Improving Older Adults’ Mental and Emotional Well-Being with Home Health Care

Seniors go through a lot of changes that can impact their mental and emotional health. Some of these changes are minor and occur gradually, while others are significant and abrupt.

Below are some of the challenges older adults face that may compromise their psychological well-being.

Challenges That Impact Seniors’ Emotional and Mental Health

Isolation and Loneliness

Different factors can fuel feelings of loneliness and isolation among older adults. These include:

– the death of their spouse, relatives, or close friends
– losing their jobs
– retiring from careers that defined their identity and gave them a sense of purpose and self-worth
– the absence of people they can regularly talk to and confide in
– mobility and transportation challenges that also lead to decreased social activities

Prolonged loneliness can have detrimental effects on seniors’ health. It can weaken their immune system and put them at higher risk of chronic diseases.

Loss of independence

As their health continues to decline, older adults find themselves unable to do things on their own. They may need help cleaning the house, rely on others for transportation, or require assistance when using the toilet or taking a bath. Others may be suffering from chronic illnesses or recovering from injuries that keep them in bed for weeks or months.

All these may leave your elderly loved one feeling helpless and frustrated. They may fear losing their independence and having less control over their lives.

Memory issues

Occasional memory lapses are a normal part of aging. But factors like illnesses, lack of sleep, or depression may worsen older adults’ forgetfulness.

These memory issues can frustrate older adults and even pose threats to their health and safety. They may forget to take medications on time, or accidentally leave stoves and ovens on.

Vulnerability to stress and mental health concerns

Aside from the changes mentioned above, other challenges can increase stress among the elderly.

Their fear of slipping or getting injured can make them more anxious to go to the bathroom alone or leave the house without a companion.

Financial concerns may also weigh them down. They may be worried about not being able to pay for growing medical and living costs or long-term care.

Chronic stress can increase the risk of mental health issues among seniors. According to the World Health Organization, 7 percent of adults over 60 years are suffering from depression and 3.8 percent from anxiety disorders. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also revealed that men 85 years or older had the highest suicide rate of any age group.

Chronic illnesses also leave seniors more vulnerable to depression and other mental health concerns. These mental health issues can further impact their physical health and recovery. For instance, seniors suffering from loneliness and depression have higher mortality rates. Depression also affects the success and duration of cardiovascular treatment in older adults. It can even aggravate insomnia and memory loss.

Augmenting Psychosocial Support for the Elderly Through Home Health Care

The benefits home care workers provide go beyond physical assistance. They become additional sources of psychosocial support, helping seniors navigate challenges that come with aging.

Regular emotional support

Having someone to talk to may help older adults manage difficult emotions like loneliness, fear, and frustration. Moreover, having constant emotional support can help reduce their risk of developing mental and physical issues.

Companionship and socialization

The companionship home care workers provide can alleviate chronic loneliness among seniors. They can also help older adults maintain an active social life by:

– driving them to community activities or visits to family and friends
– accompanying them during walks
– helping them use video chat tools to keep in touch with relatives and friends

These activities help seniors stay connected, keeping feelings of isolation and loneliness at bay. Participating in social activities gives them something to look forward to and allows them to create new memories and connections.

Supporting healthy routines

Healthy eating and exercise keep seniors strong and improve their balance. These also keep their memory sharp, boost their mood and help them relax and manage stress.

In-home senior caregivers and home health aides can help older adults stay fit and stick to healthy routines. For example, they can prepare nutritious meals and ensure these meet seniors’ dietary requirements. They assist them during light exercises, accompany them during walks, and inspire them to resume their hobbies.

Physical support to maintain their independence and quality of life

Aging in place allows seniors to retain their sense of independence and control over decisions that affect their lives. Living in a familiar place, surrounded by things that bring them comfort, may also give them a sense of security amidst the changes they are going through.

Home care workers help seniors stay independent while reducing the risks and difficulties that come with aging in place. They help older adults keep their homes clean and safe by handling light housekeeping tasks and removing hazards like electrical cords and rugs. They help them maintain personal hygiene by assisting them with bathing and dressing.

Home health care agencies provide seniors and their loved ones with cost-effective home care options. This flexibility in terms of the type of care and cost can reduce seniors’ financial stress. Clients can decide how often to request these services and what tasks they need help with. Older adults who are recovering from injuries or illnesses can also save on hospitalization costs through in-home skilled nursing care.

Promoting Holistic Health for Seniors

Changes that come with aging can hurt your elderly loved one’s mental and emotional well-being.

This is an area where home care can help. Home care workers become constant sources of social support for seniors, helping them experience healthy aging and a better quality of life.

Aging-in-Place: It Can Be Detrimental to Your Health

Surveys show that most people when asked prefer to spend the last years of their lives in their homes rather than in a community or institutional setting. What they fail to consider…or don’t want to consider…is the prospect of being homebound and spending their last years alone with only an aide for companionship. As human beings, we are social animals who are meant to interact. Living in isolation, for most of us, is detrimental to our health and has been shown to be one of the leading health risk factors contributing to the downturn in the health of older adults.

home healthUnderstanding that most state governments no longer want to be in the nursing home business and that it is their assumption that it is less costly for both the government and the elderly to remain at home, I can see why the aging-in-place movement has gathered so much steam in recent years. Prevailing ageism also factors in when those who need assistance with activities of daily living choose to protect themselves from the ageist attitudes that pervade the public discourse on “old people.” It feels safer to stay at home.

There is another secret that the aging industrial complex does not like to talk about…the cost.

If ,I will come back to the “if” later on,an elderly person can get the optimum care and needs help 12-24 hours a day, adding this to the overhead of keeping a home, the cost can be astronomical. Because of longevity, the soaring costs of medical care and personal assistance, and the lack of a good long-term care program in this country, many seniors today run out of financial resources before the end of life. In my role as a political social worker, I know that Medicaid was not originally set up to be a long-term care provider; and I am also concerned about the financial strain this puts on government. There has to be a better way, and boomers all over our country are searching for better alternatives for living out their lives.

Why do I feel so strongly that aging-in-place is not the panacea that our government, our media, and the many senior service providers around the country are promoting?

My story starts with Hurricane Sandy. At the time that Sandy struck the east coast of New York, my elderly parents were aging-in-place in their co-op apartment in Long Beach on Long Island’s south shore. My dad, who has multiple chronic conditions that keep him wheelchair bound and unable to take care of his own personal needs, had an aide. His financial resources had already been depleted by the cost of his care for the two previous years, and he was receiving Medicaid benefits for home care. Although he really needed 24/7 care, the most that Medicaid would approve was 12 hour live-in. (This is where that “if” comes in).

Twelve hour live-in means that the aide lived in with my parents but only provided care for 12 hours a day. It seems that my 90 year old mom was determined to be able to care for him the other 12 hours. Well, let me tell you, a 90 year old cannot care for another 90 year old without compromising their own health and well-being. As a result, my parents became emergency room regulars at Long Beach hospital, just a few blocks from their home. In turn my sister and I were also emergency room regulars. A couple of months before Sandy hit we began to have a discussion about aging-in-place and that it might no longer a viable option for our family. And then came Sandy.

When people ask me about aging-in-place, I tell them, “It works until it doesn’t.”

After evacuating my parents with aide in tow and all the attendant chaos around relocating them, we came to the realization that they could not return to their home. All of the services they used were compromised or non-existent. The hospital was washed away and has not opened to this day. My mom’s doctor’s office was under water, leaving her with no medical records. Fortunately my dad’s medical care was being provided at home by the Veterans’ Administration, so his care could continue without too much interruption. The only blessing we could see at the time was their car, which floated down the road with every other automobile in Long Beach.

With the advocacy and support of my colleagues in the aging community of NYC, the Hebrew Home at Riverdale came through and provided a permanent home for mom and dad. My mom, who passed away this past January, spent the happiest year of the last ten years of her life there. She was 91 years old. Her life in Long Beach was becoming more and more an isolated existence.  Most of her friends had died and the burden of caring for my dad kept her from leaving her apartment except for her trips to the supermarket and doctor. With the responsibility for my dad lifted, she was now free. Although frail and deaf, her cognizance was excellent.

She made wonderful friends, joined in activities, began going to synagogue on Friday nights, went on shopping trips, and began to care again about what she wore and how she looked. Her best friend at the Hebrew Home was Rose, who was born deaf and was teaching my mom American Sign Language. She attended several 100 year old birthday parties. She and my dad celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary at the Hebrew Home with all their new friends in attendance. The other thing I noticed was that she was secure about having her own needs met…no more 911 calls and emergency room visits. She fully embraced her new home.

My dad, who needed 24/7 care resided in a different section of the facility, where he remains today. All the buildings on this beautiful campus are connected to each other, and my mom saw him every day and was his best friend and advocate. The common denominator among my dad’s floor mates is their inability to care for their own physical needs. There is, however, a huge cognizance spectrum. My dad seems to be located about mid-point on the spectrum. It is easy to discount the inner humanity among these people who are often confused, do not make sense even when talking to each other, and sometimes do not even seem to be aware of their surroundings. I must admit that my own ageist attitudes often came to the surface when I would visit his floor. One emotional and dear incident changed my entire perception of who these people are.

My mom died of congestive heart failure, and she did not suffer much at all. She had only been diagnosed about three months before her death and was only ill the last three weeks while spending the last week in the hospital. Although we tried to prepare my dad, his memory issues prevented him from fully grasping the situation. After she passed away, my sister and I went to tell him. He was in his dining room just about to sit down to dinner. We wheeled him out to a private area and broke the news as gently as we could…but there really is no gentle way. He reacted as was expected and appropriate. It was very sad.

When we were feeling the need to leave, dinner was over; and most of his floor mates were out wandering the halls in their wheelchairs and with their walkers. As you can imagine, we were having a difficult time leaving. I walked over to one of the aides, saying, “We really need to go, but it’s so hard for us to leave him alone and just say ‘bye dad, we’ll see you tomorrow’.” She waved her finger and said, “No, no. You see all these people. They are just hovering, waiting for the two of you to leave.”

As we waited for the elevator, my sister and I could see into the area where we left my dad. One by one, each of his floor mates came up to him, and each in their own way told him how sorry they were. Some just patted his arm, others hugged him, and as we were getting on the elevator, we watched the aides help them form a circle around dad. I turned to my sister and said, “He’s not alone.”

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