Trigger Warning: A Chinese Father Saved More Than 300 People at Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge

“I understand these people. I know they are tired of living here. They have had difficulties. They have no one to help them.” – Chen Si

Since the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge was first built in 1968, an estimated 2,000 people have died from suicide involving the bridge. According to data from 1995-99, in China’s first national survey in 2002, death from suicide accounted for 3.6 percent of the country’s total deaths. During that period of time, 287,000 Chinese people died from suicide every year, putting the average suicide rate at 23 per 100,000 people.

Chen Si, also known as The Angel of Nanjing, has been patrolling this bridge every Saturday for more than 20 years and has managed to save more than 300 people from death by suicide. He is a 52-year-old father from Nanjing, the capital of Jiangsu province of the People’s Republic of China. Following the loss of a close relative to suicide, Chen Si has taken up this cause because someone needs to.

A Long History

The relationship between mental illness and suicide is controversial in China. Those who follow traditional Chinese philosophy are not encouraged to express their feelings, nor are they encouraged to expect their environment to change to suit their needs. Therefore, intense misery and feelings of despair may go unrecognized, and suicidal symptoms are not easily detected by Chinese medical professionals. In fact, many doctors working in rural areas do not understand the symptoms of depression and often receive low salaries, which discourages more doctors from entering the mental-health field.

Gender Differences

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) statistics, China’s suicide rate in the 1990s was 20 per 100,000 people. In the 1990s, female suicides were higher than male suicides by a factor of three. While China remains one of the few countries with a higher suicide rate among women than men, recent data shows that these disparities have evened out. In 2016, suicide rates among Chinese men and women came up almost even at 9.1 per 100,000 men and 10.3 per 100,000 women. Overall, China’s suicide rate in 2016 was 9.7 per 100,000 people, which was among the lowest globally.

A 2002 survey also revealed that 88 percent of females who died from suicide used agricultural pesticides or rat poison. Although China initially eliminated highly toxic pesticides to improve the safety of its farm produce, the elimination also had a substantial impact on the reduction of deaths from suicide among women. Research shows that men tend to attempt suicide through violent means such as hanging, whereas women tend to attempt suicide with medication. Overall, most studies indicate a decline in suicide rates among all gender and regional categories in China. The studies also recommended targeted suicide prevention programs, particularly for people in rural areas.

Shifting Tide

Women’s freedom, urbanization, and decreased access to toxic pesticides are key reasons behind the decline in suicide rates. According to Jing Jun, a professor at Tsinghua University in Beijing, “female independence has saved a lot of women.” The founding of New China in 1949 in combination with the opening-up policy in the late 1970s and the continuous growth of China’s economy has led to more equitable opportunities for women. Additionally, urbanization removed certain social constraints leading to more freedom for women. For instance, escaping an abusive partner or household may be easier in a city than in a small village.

Despite a decline in death by suicide rates in China, this is an area that we should pay more attention to. Chen Si acts as an angel, but he cannot do this work alone. He hopes that officials consider building a net across the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge to prevent deaths by suicide. 

Resources Available

The Crisis Intervention Centre, the first of its kind in China, was established by Nanjing Brain Hospital to provide psychological advice and support to Chinese people. The Centre also has a hotline, which can be reached at 862583712977.

The Lifeline Shanghai at (400) 821 1215 is a free, confidential, and anonymous support service that is open 365 days a year from 10am-10pm GMT+8. 

Facebook and other social media platforms also offer many virtual support groups for individuals experiencing hardship. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 is a 27/4, free and confidential resource to support people in distress, prevention, or in an active crisis. Users should utilize the translate function on these web pages to adjust for language barriers, if necessary.

Trigger Warning: Holistic Public Policy Can Save Lives From Suicide

At the age of 17, I lost my older brother, David, to suicide. As a gay man in his early 20s, David struggled with mental health conditions and social isolation. His loss affected my family, his friends, and me forever. It was then that I decided to dedicate my life to suicide prevention.

His loss, and the loss of so many others, makes the 2020 data showing that the suicide rate in the United States has increased by 1.4 percent even more upsetting. Michigan’s suicide rate has increased by over 33 percent since 1999, and among young people ages 10 to 24, the rate has climbed by 56 percent since 2007, making it the second leading cause of death for that age group.

Despite these sobering statistics, I’m confident that we can prevent suicide.

In the past couple of years, Michigan has taken great steps toward suicide prevention and mental health promotion. In a past legislative session, Senate Bill 228 established the State Suicide Prevention Commission, and House Bill 4051 established a statewide mental health crisis line. The passage of each of these bills highlights our legislators’ commitment to saving lives – but there is more we can do.

We need a holistic set of public policies that works to promote well-being and ensure safety across all contexts in which our young people live, learn, and play.

For example, in 2019 Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. introduced Senate Bill 532 to mandate suicide prevention instruction for K-12 students and professional development training for public school teachers and staff. As of the start of 2020, Michigan was one of only 15 states that encourages such training but does not require it. In comparison, 18 states mandate suicide prevention training but do not specify if it must be annual. Whereas 13 states have mandated annual suicide prevention training for school personnel.

In addition to training, 22 states also mandate comprehensive school policies on implementing suicide prevention education, responding to students in crisis, and handling suicide deaths. Again, Michigan has no such mandated policies.

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), in partnership with The Trevor Project, the American School Counselor Association, and the National Association of School Psychologists has developed a Model School District Policy on suicide prevention. The document outlines policies and best practices that school districts can follow to protect the health and safety of all students.

Outside of the school, numerous other policies can help save young lives. For example, while federally mandated, Michigan is among a staggering number of states that currently have no laws guaranteeing mental health parity — the assurance that insurance companies will cover mental health care in the same way they cover physical health care.

In addition, 20 states now have laws banning conversion therapy – the practice of counseling or psychotherapy that attempts to change one’s sexual orientation or gender identity. The negative effects of such practices are well documented and include increased suicide risk, decreased self-esteem and well-being, disrupted healthy identity development, and increased social isolation. As it stands, Michigan only partially bans conversion therapy for minors, along with four other states. In total, 20 states ban the practice for minors outright, 3 are still settling the issue in court, and 22 states have no policy or mandate regarding the practice.

As a researcher, advocate, and brother, I know we need policies that are proactive rather than reactive, address multiple contexts, and dismantle the stigma around suicide. We can and must do more to save lives and bring hope to those affected by suicide.

Simple Intervention Proves Effective in Reducing Suicide Among Active-Duty Soldiers

Suicidal behavior among active-duty service members can be reduced for up to six months with a relatively simple intervention that gives them concrete steps to follow during an emotional crisis, according to a new study from the University of Utah’s National Center for Veterans Studies.

The study’s findings show there was a 75 percent reduction in suicide attempts among participants who engaged in crisis response planning versus a contract for safety. Crisis response planning also was associated with a significantly faster decline in suicidal thoughts and fewer inpatient hospitalization days.

Craig J. Bryan, an associate professor of psychology and director of the U’s National Center for Veterans Studies, led the research team. The study titled “Effect of crisis response planning vs. contracts for safety on suicide risk in U.S. Army Soldiers” was published online on Jan. 24 in The Journal of Affective Disorders.

Co-authors include researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, the University of Utah, the University of Memphis, and the U.S. Army.

The Pentagon said last April that 265 active-duty service members killed themselves in 2015, continuing a steady increase in suicides noted since 2001. In response to this tragic trend, the Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration has made suicide prevention a priority, supporting interventions and studies of how to help the nation’s warriors.

“Our results mark a critical next step in preventing military suicides,” said Bryan.

The study compared the effectiveness of two risk management strategies:

• Contract for safety, which entails getting a commitment from a suicidal patient to avoid self harm — what not to do.

• Crisis response planning, which involves writing on an index card the steps for identifying one’s personal warning signs along with coping strategies, social support, and professional services to use in a crisis — what to do.

The researchers also conducted an analysis to see if an enhanced crisis response plan that added an explicit discussion of the participant’s reasons for living would provide even better results, but this enhancement did no better or worse than a standard crisis response plan without this enhancement.

Each participant had active suicide ideation and/or a lifetime history of attempted suicide and had actively sought help at a military medical clinic in Fort Carson, Colorado, in 2013 and between January 2015 and February 2016. The soldiers were offered one of the three interventions, which varied in the combination of supportive counseling, strategies to manage emotional distress, education about crisis services and referrals to treatment services. The researchers followed the 97 participants over a six-month follow-up period.

The crisis response plan was a central ingredient of another successful treatment developed by many of the same researchers at the National Center for Veterans Studies — brief cognitive behavioral therapy — which contributed to a 60 percent reduction in suicide attempts among active duty soldiers. The results of that study were published in 2015.

“Our previous results showing a significant reduction in suicide attempts were based on a treatment that heavily emphasized crisis response planning,” Bryan said. “This time around, we tested crisis response planning by itself and found that it reduced suicide attempts as well. This bolsters our confidence in the technique’s effectiveness.”

Overall, the findings show that giving active-duty service members who are at risk of suicide a crisis response plan may be a more effective way to keep them safe than a contract for safety. And because of its brevity and simplicity, the crisis response plan strategy could feasibly be implemented in a wide range of medical settings by diverse health care professionals.

“Suicidal individuals don’t always visit mental health clinics when in crisis,” Bryan said. “They also visit emergency departments and primary care clinics or talk to friends and family members. Crisis response planning could be a practical and effective way to connect those in greatest need of potentially life-saving treatment.”

The National Center for Veterans Studies at the University of Utah leads the nation in suicide prevention and PTSD research and treatment. The center has developed and tested the only scientifically supported methods to prevent suicidal behavior among military personnel. Many veterans die by suicide, often as a result of untreated PTSD, at a rate of 20 deaths each day on average.

First Responder Mental Health: It’s Not All In The Mind

IN THE MIND web2

Our police, paramedics, firefighters and rescue personnel help keep our communities safe. However, the general public does not view this population group as vulnerable. While in the mental health field, doctors, psychologists and social workers are seeing a very different picture with alarming suicide rates and a high incidence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Emergency services responders are trained to look after others, but not themselves. It’s a global issue, one that is being increasingly brought to light by the courage of those who suffer and their supporters speaking out.

With many helping professionals working from a traditional medical model, mental health issues among first responders tend to be identified primarily as a response to attending traumatic incidents. Treatment is inclined to be focused on therapies such as CBT, DBT, EMDR and mindfulness. These approaches focus on individual change and evidence certainly suggests that these types of treatments are invaluable in terms of strengthening the individual’s coping and resilience skills.

However, we must be mindful how the systems in which the individual functions will also have an impact on their mental health. When working with emergency services responders and their families, it is vital that therapists and health promotion workers understand ALL the factors which impact wellbeing, not just in response to mental health issues but also in developing prevention strategies.

So, what are some of these “other” factors, or determinants warranting attention when dealing with emergency services wellbeing?

1) Emergency services culture – historically emergency services culture has fostered the ‘toughen up’ attitude, deeming the admission of mental health issues as a ‘weakness’ . Admitting this weakness not only reflects on the individual but also on the ‘brotherhood’ which values pride and strength.

2) Organisational culture- whilst changes are being made in some organisations, there are ingrained fears (real or perceived) from responders that any admission of mental health issues will either deem them unfit for work, or will stop them from getting promoted.

3) Workplace Stigma– there are real and perceived fears of work colleagues judging a responder as ‘weak’, particularly if a number of them have been to the same call outs, but only one speaks out about struggling. A lack of understanding of stress responses and the individuality of conditions such as depression, anxiety and PTSD leads to judgement and alienation of the individual affected, rather than what is needed – support.

4) Societal Expectations – Let’s face it, we all grew up thinking of police, firefighters and paramedics as heroes. They’re the people who protect us, and save our lives! We’ve been taught to listen to their instructions, trust their judgement in crisis and look to them for guidance when in danger. Somehow it doesn’t make sense to acknowledge that these ’heroes’ are human just like us!

5) Lifestyle changes Whether the responder is full time, part time or a volunteer, from the moment of recruitment personal and family lifestyle require changes. Inconvenient rosters, critical incidents, unexpected call outs and changes in household roles and routines are just some of the challenges faced by emergency services responders and their families.

6) Family Support– families of first responders have unique stresses and unique expectations. But it’s difficult to discuss these stresses and expectations outside emergency services circles. Firstly there is this feeling that the general public won’t understand. More significantly, divulging that their responder family member is suffering in some way feels like they’re breaching an unwritten ‘confidentiality code’ such as don’t embarrass the organisation, the crew or the individual by speaking about individual or family mental health issues. What happens on the job stays on the job which extends to family members. There is also the old belief that telling your family about any incidents affecting you will adversely impact that family member’s mental health. Organisational confidentiality regulations support that notion – yet talking about and processing traumatic incidents is critical in any recovery process.

7) Relevant Social Support. When responders experience work related stress, they have a number of barriers to disclosing struggles to friends who are not part of the emergency services culture. One barrier is confidentiality – they are not supposed to discuss the details of their work with anyone from the general public. Secondly, there is the notion (real or perceived) that those who haven’t done the job could not possibly understand what they’ve experienced. Thirdly, there is the reluctance to ‘burden’ civilians with the graphic details of incidents for fear they may end up suffering vicariously as a result of the disclosures.

What advice can those in the helping professions take from this?

If you treat an emergency services person with depression, anxiety or PTSD without understanding the context in which their illness or injury occurred, then you are not only doing your client a disservice, but you could in fact be damaging their potential for an effective recovery. It is vital that you have a genuine understanding of emergency services culture both today and historically.

Secondly, should we as professionals not be advocating on behalf of this group? In Australia alone there are over 400,000 paid, part time and volunteer emergency services responders – add their family members and that’s a huge population group affected by unique stresses! To advocate effectively, helping professionals need to understand the systems their lives function in, and systems which impact on wellbeing and recovery.

Thirdly, there is a strong need to focus on prevention – on a global level the media are telling us there is a “mental health crisis among emergency services workers.” We’ve seen these sorts of reports for years. What is actually happening to prevent mental health issues among emergency services responders? What sorts of consultations are happening? Who is invited to these consultations? Who is the information from these consultations being disseminated to? And what are the results of these consultations “on the frontline”?

No matter what field of practice you are in, I urge you to educate yourself on ALL the factors impacting the mental health of those who keep us, our families and our communities safe.

Why You Haven’t Heard about the #DoubtfireFace Challenge

mrsdoubtfire

The ALS “Ice Bucket Challenge” is undoubtedly one of the most successful and engaging fundraising efforts in recent history. The challenge, which involved posting a video of yourself getting doused by a bucket of ice water, quickly gained popularity and became a social phenomenon. Teens, adults, celebrities, politicians, and even former President George W. Bush all took part in the challenge, with their videos gaining tens of millions of views. The result? The ALS Foundation saw donations skyrocket to over $110 million, a gigantic increase over the $2.7 million raised during the same time period last year. These incredible results show how the power of social media can be harnessed to raise awareness and support important causes.

But at the same time, the Ice Bucket Challenge (a term which the ALS Foundation has moved to trademark) swept across the internet, another challenge was desperately trying to gain traction. The #DoubtfireFace Challenge benefiting the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention (AFSP) aims to raise awareness about suicide. Instead of a dumping cold water on your head, the challenge encourages participants to take cake (or whipped cream) to the face, recreating the classic scene in Mrs. Doubtfire where late actor Robin Williams dunked his face in a cake. According to the website, the goal of the challenge is to celebrate Robin Williams while raising money for suicide prevention efforts. The challenge has all the same ingredients that made the Ice Bucket Challenge so successful: a laugh-inducing activity, ability to challenge your friends and family, and raising awareness for an important cause. So why haven’t you heard of the #DoubtfireFace Challenge?

The answer itself is simple, but the problem it highlights is not. Depression and suicide are highly stigmatized, and for this reason people are uncomfortable talking about suicide and chose to avoid the topic all together. The public discourse about suicide that does occur is often fraught with misunderstanding and judgment. This was alarmingly evident after the death of Robin Williams, which many people termed a “selfish act” by the actor. Such comments perpetuate stigma of mental illness and further exacerbate the problem with how suicide is viewed in the media and by the public at large.

The truth is, depression is a chronic disease of the brain just as is ALS. They both affect the brain and can rob the individual of quality of life, make daily functions more difficult, and impact an individual’s ability to care for their self. And, at their worst, they both claim lives. The biggest difference between suicide and ALS is that no one blames the individual for having ALS. You’re not considered “selfish” or at-fault when you suffer from ALS. Certainly no one in the media labels ALS as the product of some personal deficit or weakness.

What makes this problem all the more heartbreaking is that suicide claims 535% more lives than ALS every single year. Even more staggering is that suicide is the second leading cause of death globally for 15-29 year olds. These statistics aren’t doctored, they’re reality. Yet, despite the shocking reality of the situation, we as a society continue to remain silent when it comes to suicide prevention efforts.

Every single day we choose to remain silent, another 100 people die to suicide in America. These are lives we could be saving if we starting speaking up. Donations to organizations that provide suicide prevention directly saves lives. The money often goes to pay counselors and other front-line prevention efforts. You have a chance to save a life today, if you chose to. Will you accept the #DoubtfireFace Challenge?

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, there are people who can help. Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or visit the website by clicking here or to make a donation to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention visit their website by clicking here.

Watch the University of Kentucky Counseling Center participate in the #DoubtFireFace Challenge at the Wildcat Wellness and Suicide Prevent Fair on September 30, 2014. Please feel free to share your videos with me at google.com/+PaulCMilford

*Author’s Note: The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention was asked to provide a comment for this article, they declined.

North Carolina 2014 Short Session, Week 8: Medicaid Budget Miracle

Social workers found victory during the eighth week of the legislative short session with the acceptance of the proposed medicaid budget. On Monday night, the last day of the fiscal year, the Senate rejected the House mini budget, Senate Bill 3 without even voting, and they returned the bill to the House for further consideration. In kind, the House then returned the bill back to the Senate on Tuesday stating they did not follow the rules by rejecting Senate Bill 3 without a vote. This unusual game of ping pong with the budget sent the bill to a committee meeting with the appointed budget conferees and no further discussion happened on the floor of the House or Senate.

MiraclesOn Wednesday, the appointed 41-member budget conferees held an unusual open-to-the-public meeting. During the meeting, differences in the House and Senate budgets were discussed and the group broke into a private negotiating meeting. Upon return to the public meeting, the Senate announced that they would accept the House Medicaid budget with a few compromises that had been made before the meeting starting.

The acceptance of the Medicaid budget means the aged, blind, and disabled citizens on Medicaid will not lose services. We are excited the Senate acted on behalf of our advocacy efforts to save services for these populations. While the Senate agreed to the Medicaid spending, the conferees are still working out differences in teacher pay raises, the education lottery, and film incentives.

Bills with Relevance:

  • House Bill 1181 North Carolina Medicaid Modernization: This bill was introduced a few weeks ago with controversy in Section 10 regarding a pilot for I/DD patients living in certain group settings to have integrated physical and behavioral health care under Cardinal Behavioral Health. Under the new edition, this section becomes a study with multiple stakeholders involved. The bill was discussed in committee and passed the House with a vote of 113 to 0. The bill now goes to the Senate where support is underwhelming as Senators do not believe this plan, supported by the House and the Governor, will do much to make Medicaid a cost predicting system.
  • House Joint Resolution 1262 Suicide Prevention Resolution: On Wednesday, House members read the suicide prevention resolution on the floor. The resolution directs the Legislative Research Commission to study ways to prevent suicide among minors and veterans including training for key health care providers that work to assess, treat and manage patients with suicidal ideation. After overwhelming, bipartisan support from legislators who shared personal stories on the floor, the bill passed with no opposition and was sent to the Senate. Following the reading of the resolution, NASW-NC, NAMI-NC, The Mental Health Association, and others were recognized in the gallery by legislators for our support and continued work on suicide prevention in our state. Representative Cunningham (D-Mecklenburg), a primary sponsor of the legislation, gave a heartfelt, personal speech on the bill and credited social workers and educators for help during her family’s situation. We are grateful to the many legislators who stood up to speak on what can be such a tough topic for many.

What to look forward to this week:

Legislators have announced they are finished with committee work. They will use this week to focus on the budget and work out their differences. There are a few more bills expected to be heard on the floor this week but it should mostly be a quiet week with budget work being done behind closed doors.

Short Session, Week 7 and Still No Budget

The end of session should be approaching soon. The evidence? The large volume of bills that were gutted, amended, and flew through the legislature last week. The House and Senate are still divided on how large the Medicaid shortfall really might be – up to a $248 million difference between the two proposed budgets.

Pope-Southern StudiesThis was evidenced when the Senate nearly subpoenaed the State Budget Director, Art Pope to show up at their second budget meeting on Medicaid as he and his staff did not show up to one the previous week. Legislators grilled Mr. Pope on not being able to give definite numbers on the shortfall or how many adults and children are enrolled in Medicaid in the state. This tension continues to hold up the proposed budget for the House and the Senate.

Today, the House read the Suicide Prevention Resolution. The resolution called on NC to develop measures to help prevent suicide particularly for youth and veterans. Those in attendance were recognized by legislators in the House gallery during session. Many spent the day talking to legislators about how important the resolution is for young people and veterans in our state.

Last week, the Governor sent a directive to state departments to operate with the biggest cuts in the proposed budgets, but this does not include teacher assistants and massive cuts to the Aged, Blind, and Disabled on Medicaid. This would also mean no pay raises for state employees and teachers- a major goal outlined by legislators prior to the start of the short session.

Relevant bills with action:

  • SB 3 2014 Budget Mods./Pay Raises/Other Changes: Deemed the “mini budget,” this bill is a smaller version of the budget bill Senate Bill 744 and adjustments to the current budget. Raises for state employees and teachers will be paid for with agreed upon cuts. The bill does not do much to Medicaid. The bill passed the House unanimously, 117 to 0, and was sent to the Senate for concurrence. It is unsure if the Senate will agree to this mini budget with all the controversy regarding the Medicaid shortfall calculations.
  • SB 493 Health and Safety Regulatory Reform: Last Tuesday, legislators split the large Regulatory Reform Bill (Senate Bill 493) into two separate bills. SB 493 became Health and Safety Regulatory Reform that includes measures for autism insurance for anyone up to age 23 that was diagnosed before age 8, establishes a behavioral analyst licensing board, requires all health benefit plans cover prescribed, orally administered cancer drugs, and prohibits tanning bed use by anyone under age 18. The bill quickly passed committee and went to the floor. On Wednesday night, after much debate, legislators approved the bill with a vote of 78 to 32. Because of changes made to the bill, the bill has to return to the Senate for concurrence. It does not have to go through Senate committees. and if the Senate confers, the bill will go to the Governor to be signed into law.
  • SJR 882 Honor Senator Martin Nesbitt: Both the House and Senate honored late Senator Martin Nesbitt who died suddenly on March 6th, a week after being diagnosed with stomach cancer. Senator Nesbitt, from Buncombe County, was a champion for the social work profession. He was a long standing legislator, serving in both the House and Senate during his time. He is greatly missed!
  • HB 369 Criminal Law Changes/WC Illegal Aliens: The original bill was gutted and new language was inserted in the bill to address several criminal law changes. This bill does multiple things: it will expunge certain drug offenses with no age limitation and it directs the Human Trafficking Commission to study Erin’s Law (a bill NASW-NC has been working on to get a licensed clinical social worker involved). It will be heard on the Senate floor tonight. If approved, it will only need concurrence from the House before it goes to the Governor to be signed into law.
  • HB 1220 Hope 4 Haley and Friends: After passing the House last week, a Senate committee debated the bill and it was sent to the Senate floor. The bill allows for hemp oil extract from the cannabis plant to be used for youth with certain seizure disorders when no other treatment has worked. The bill does allow for UNC Chapel Hill, East Carolina, Wake Forest and Duke Universities to develop, conduct research, and participate in clinical trials with the oil. Neurologists, patients and caregivers who prescribe or are prescribed the oil would have to register under the legislation with a registry established by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Once DHHS approves measures and establishes the registry, families can start using the oil. The bill passed the Senate, the House concurred with a few changes that were made, and the bill was sent to the Governor for signature. The Governor has stated he will sign the bill into law.

Related news:

While not a priority piece of legislation for NASW-NC, we wanted to address the comments made by Representative and Speaker Pro Tem Skip Stam regarding sexual orientation in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV- TR (DSM-IV-TR) when discussed during debate on Senate Bill 793 Charter School Modifications. During debate, Representative Fisher put forth an amendment to prohibit charter schools from discriminating based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

The debate spurred questions on the definition of sexual orientation and Representative Stam shared with House members a memo from the outdated 2000 DSM-IV-TR on sexual paraphilias that listed a number of sexual perversions and disorders as well as homosexuality. The DSM removed homosexuality as a disorder in 1974. The amendment did not pass. On the second day of debate, Representative Ramsey pushed an amendment that would prohibit charter schools from discriminating based on any category under federal law or the Constitution. This amendment was approved and the bill passed.

NASW-NC does not support any form of discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. We are pleased that House members found common ground not to discriminate in charter schools to further protect North Carolinians.

Photo Courtesy of Southern Studies

Do You Know What to Do If You Think Someone is Suicidal #SWUnited Live Twitter Chat 11/19/12 at 8PM EST

by Deona Hooper, MSW

On November 19, 2012 at 8PM EST, we will have a  live twitter chat to discuss suicide prevention and the social work response. I have attached the link to the National Suicide Prevention website for information and tools for use in practice. Here is the link as follows:  http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

@swhelpercom will be moderating the debate using the hashtag #SWUnited with guests @harperlevy and @drbillschmitz

Here is an excerpt from Psycentral entitled “What to do when you think someone is suicidal“:

Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the U.S., and the third leading cause of death for 15 to 24 year olds. Still, suicide remains a taboo topic, is highly stigmatized and is surrounded by myth and mystery.

One of the biggest — and most destructive — myths is that if you discuss suicide, you’re planting the idea in someone’s head, said Scott Poland, Ed.D, the prevention division director at the American Association of Suicidology and associate professor at Nova Southeastern University. Clinical psychologist and suicide expert William Schmitz, Psy.D., likens it to talking to someone who’s recently been diagnosed with cancer. By mentioning cancer, you’re not forcing the topic front and center. “If someone is diagnosed with cancer, it’s on their mind.” Bringing it up shows support and concern. Similarly, by talking about suicide, you show the person that you truly care about them. In fact, lack of connection is a key reason why people have suicidal thoughts; isolation contributes to and escalates their pain. Do you know what to do if someone is suicidal?

Read More

Update  The Live Twitter Chat on Suicide Prevention and Identification brought to light some interesting perspective. Here are few of the tweets and the full archived discussion is attached.

View Archived Chat: http://storify.com/SWUnited/

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